Eight years on from their last full-length album, I Like Trains return with KOMPROMAT. The band takes an unflinching view of a world that has changed beyond all recognition in that time. It's a record digging beneath populism's rise, from the divide and conquer tactics that caused Brexit in the UK, to the ascent of Trump in America and the subsequent reign of lies and misinformation, to discover the grubby hands that have engineered it all. Press Sheet: I Like Trains - KOMPROMAT "We find that whole communities suddenly fix their minds upon one object, and go mad in it's pursuit; that millions of people become simultaneously impressed with one delusion, and run after it, till their attention is caught by some new folly more captivating than the first. " Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds - Charles Mackay, 1841Eight years on from their last full-length album, I Like Trains return with KOMPROMAT. The band takes an unflinching view of a world that has changed beyond all recognition in that time. It's a record digging beneath populism's rise, from the divide and conquer tactics that caused Brexit in the UK, to the ascent of Trump in America and the subsequent reign of lies and misinformation, to discover the grubby hands that have engineered it all. "An I Like Trains record doesn't really start to take shape until there's a theme", says the group's vocalist and lyricist David Martin. "That point came following Edward Snowden's NSA leaks in 2013. " At the time, Martin started writing about low-key, insidious intrusions on our privacy. As global events unfolded, however, so did the importance of those themes: the perception of what is true and what isn't true being challenged on a daily basis and how that confusion could be used to manipulate populations into thinking and voting in certain ways. "We didn't set out to write a record about current affairs, but the path we set out on converged drastically with that daily discourse. The album inadvertently became about populist politics
Eight years on from their last full-length album, I Like Trains return with KOMPROMAT. The band takes an unflinching view of a world that has changed beyond all recognition in that time. It's a record digging beneath populism's rise, from the divide and conquer tactics that caused Brexit in the UK, to the ascent of Trump in America and the subsequent reign of lies and misinformation, to discover the grubby hands that have engineered it all. Press Sheet: I Like Trains - KOMPROMAT "We find that whole communities suddenly fix their minds upon one object, and go mad in it's pursuit; that millions of people become simultaneously impressed with one delusion, and run after it, till their attention is caught by some new folly more captivating than the first. " Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds - Charles Mackay, 1841Eight years on from their last full-length album, I Like Trains return with KOMPROMAT. The band takes an unflinching view of a world that has changed beyond all recognition in that time. It's a record digging beneath populism's rise, from the divide and conquer tactics that caused Brexit in the UK, to the ascent of Trump in America and the subsequent reign of lies and misinformation, to discover the grubby hands that have engineered it all. "An I Like Trains record doesn't really start to take shape until there's a theme", says the group's vocalist and lyricist David Martin. "That point came following Edward Snowden's NSA leaks in 2013. " At the time, Martin started writing about low-key, insidious intrusions on our privacy. As global events unfolded, however, so did the importance of those themes: the perception of what is true and what isn't true being challenged on a daily basis and how that confusion could be used to manipulate populations into thinking and voting in certain ways. "We didn't set out to write a record about current affairs, but the path we set out on converged drastically with that daily discourse. The album inadvertently became about populist politics
4260472170366

Details

Format: CD
Label: IMPORTS
Rel. Date: 08/28/2020
UPC: 4260472170366

Kompromat
Artist: I Like Trains
Format: CD
New: Available 16.99
Wish

Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. A Steady Hand 05:45
2. Desire Is a Mess
3. Dig in 03:26
4. Prism
5. Patience Is a Virtue
6. A Man of Conviction
7. New Geography
8. The Truth 06:19
9. Eyes to the Left (Feat. Anika)

More Info:

Eight years on from their last full-length album, I Like Trains return with KOMPROMAT. The band takes an unflinching view of a world that has changed beyond all recognition in that time. It's a record digging beneath populism's rise, from the divide and conquer tactics that caused Brexit in the UK, to the ascent of Trump in America and the subsequent reign of lies and misinformation, to discover the grubby hands that have engineered it all. Press Sheet: I Like Trains - KOMPROMAT "We find that whole communities suddenly fix their minds upon one object, and go mad in it's pursuit; that millions of people become simultaneously impressed with one delusion, and run after it, till their attention is caught by some new folly more captivating than the first. " Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds - Charles Mackay, 1841Eight years on from their last full-length album, I Like Trains return with KOMPROMAT. The band takes an unflinching view of a world that has changed beyond all recognition in that time. It's a record digging beneath populism's rise, from the divide and conquer tactics that caused Brexit in the UK, to the ascent of Trump in America and the subsequent reign of lies and misinformation, to discover the grubby hands that have engineered it all. "An I Like Trains record doesn't really start to take shape until there's a theme", says the group's vocalist and lyricist David Martin. "That point came following Edward Snowden's NSA leaks in 2013. " At the time, Martin started writing about low-key, insidious intrusions on our privacy. As global events unfolded, however, so did the importance of those themes: the perception of what is true and what isn't true being challenged on a daily basis and how that confusion could be used to manipulate populations into thinking and voting in certain ways. "We didn't set out to write a record about current affairs, but the path we set out on converged drastically with that daily discourse. The album inadvertently became about populist politics